July 28, 2014
Helium Voice Changer
Helium Voice Changer is a simple app and the perfect solution to amuse kids (even adults, why not) by altering the recorded voice in a variety of possible outcomes. Here’s some of the features that make it a great entertaining solution for kids:
- 30 heroes that are ready to repeat every of your words in an altered voice of course. Your kids could listen to the sounds made by Ben 10, Vladimir Putin, Barack Obama, Steve Jobs, Spiderman as well as various animals, gangsters and even ghosts or skeletons
- Funny cartoon-ish graphic visualizations of the heroes that repeat the recordings will entertain for sure aside the actual sounds
- The app runs in offline mode too and all heroes are already included in the initial installer so no additional packages to download
- "Helium Voice Changer" is completely free and available on Google Play
Automate Your Device with Sfen
www.xda-developers.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Sven_Support-150x150.gif" height="150" width="150" style="float: left; margin: 0 15px 15px 0;" />

Changing the profile of your device manually is now long forgotten. Since the advent of Android automation applications like Tasker, we’re now able to take full advantage of automatically enabled profiles. Some OEMs have even noticed that profile management might be a good idea, and they have implemented some features into their stock firmware.


IF you are looking for a free and interesting alternative to Tasker, you should consider meeting Sfen. It’s made by XDA Senior Member greglord. With Sfen, you can create events that can be triggered when certain conditions are met. You can specify an action and the event that is triggered at certain locations.


Using apps like greglord’s can make your phone or tablet significantly smarter and more automated. Setting profiles leads to almost limitless possibilities. You can easily save battery life, start your music player, or start your favorite game when you are going to the can.


Sfen is still at a very early stage of development, so some bugs might still be present. However, the developer is fixing them and collecting ideas to make the app even better in the future.


If you are looking for the tool that will make your device more automated, Sfen may be to your liking. You can get the latest version by visiting the Sfen application thread.


The post Automate Your Device with Sfen appeared first on xda-developers.


Suggest app for review
App name: Kuro Jump
AndroidLink: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.blueboat.KuroJump
iOS:
https://itunes.apple.com/app/kuro-jump/id888779088

Description: Just tap x1 or x2 to jump into the bubble. It's easy, fun, and very addictive! Great for spending time or played when bored!

The graphics are also very cute! the white whale is cute and funny!

Currently it ranked 2nd in all categories, 2nd in all games, and 1st in arcade game in Thailand appstore
Before You Prototype a Tech Product, Ask These 5 Questions


No one wants to be behind the curve, especially in regards to technology. All too often we see brands jump on a tech trend just to do it. We’ve seen it with augmented reality, mobile and now wearables.



In an effort to be first, brands dive right into building a product without taking the time to understand their audience or think through the important details that will make or break a product launch (and, maybe, a brand) for a consumer.



But you have to move fast, too, and there is a way to get a product to market quickly and correctly — it’s by understanding your user as deeply as you know your brand. When it comes to prototyping products, I’ve found there are five key questions brands should ask their audience. Once you have these answers, you should be better informed to build a great experience — one that is useful, usable and desired.



1. What are their pain points?


People look to products to address a specific need in their lives. Wearable technology products are no exception. The challenge? Ensure your perception of your audience’s needs align with their actual needs. Build in time to conduct user research, and involve your audience in vetting your prototypes. Skipping this step will result in launching a product with no customers to use it.



2. How have previous solutions fallen short?


The wearables market is in a fairly early stage, but analysis of products on the market today can yield insights for new product opportunities.



Fitbit Force was recalled due to allergic reactions to band materials. Fitbit Flex’s clasp doesn’t stay closed. Nike’s first iteration of the Fuelband didn’t include Bluetooth connectivity, and users hated the inconvenience of plugging the device in to upload data.



Use negative ratings and reviews of products on the market today to spark ideas for future products. Forget analyst reports — just comb through the ratings and reviews of wearables products on ecommerce sites to explore flaws in the product’s hardware and software.



3. What are customers’ technology patterns?


Once you’ve clarified the audience you’re targeting, don’t forget to take the time to understand their technology likes and dislikes. Does your audience have aversions to technology, or are they ravenous, early adopters? Does a wearable tech product conjure up feelings of “obtrusive big brother” or “useful quantified self”?



4. How will they leverage the product?

Knowing how an audience primarily intends to use the product will go a long way in helping to ensure that it’s properly built. Wearable fitness trackers such as the Jawbone Up and the Fitbit Flex are great examples of this — some people wear those devices simply to know their activity levels while others use them as a comprehensive fitness guide.



You need to know what your audience plans to do with your device. It doesn’t make sense to spend time adding all sorts of unnecessary features into a product if they’ll never be touched by the consumer.



5. What would keep them from buying?


While not as paramount to the prototyping process as some of the questions above, knowing what those unacceptable product features are can be incredibly useful information.



Does a reasonable price tag overpower aesthetic? Is a clunky or outdated design a definite deal-breaker? Does functionality trump all?



Understanding what your consumer sees as the most important piece, and building your device to address that, will save your team hassle and frustration down the line.



Remember, once you have answered these questions, you are still at the beginning of a process. You have to now learn from and digest your consumer feedback, turning it into a functional prototype. Then you have to put that prototype through the paces. And you have to give the prototype back to your audience for testing. A constant cycle of development and improvement that will quickly lead to a better, useful, needed solution.



Taking the time to start with your users’ needs will certainly take a bit longer than just pushing a product to market, but, in the end, it will ensure you’re meeting the needs of your audience, which will ultimately bring more success in the long run.

The post Before You Prototype a Tech Product, Ask These 5 Questions appeared first on Mutual Mobile.

Draw a Line and Let Your Device Do the Rest with LineitApp
www.xda-developers.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/LineitApp-150x150.png" height="150" width="150" style="float: left; margin: 0 15px 15px 0;" />

Over the years, since even before Android entered the scene, we have striven to have our devices do as much as they can with as little interaction from us as humanly possible (aka the lazy effect). Lets face it, we carry these devices around because we are in constant need of being connected with others, forgetful, and always in a rush. What happens when you combine all of the aforementioned in a single daily routine? You tend to forget to do things–or worse, you remember that you need to do something while you are doing something else (i.e. texting while driving). What if we told you that there is an automation app that can allow you to set things/tasks to do on your device and forget about it? If you are thinking about Tasker, the answer is “No, it is not Tasker but something simpler.” Tasker, as good an automation tool as it is, can be overwhelmingly complex to use (depending, of course on the kind of activities that you need it to do). Because of this, there is a simpler solution that will give you just as good of a solution as the aforementioned one and it was created by XDA Forum Member LineItApp.


LineitApp is an app like no other in terms of functionality and ease of use. The app makes use of wireless communications such as WiFi, AGPS, and GPS, essentially to pinpoint your location on a map.  The map is interactive and you have to decide where you need your actions to take place by drawing a line on the map. Once you are on the move and you cross the line that you made on the map, the GPS/WiFi/etc will determine that you have gotten past that specific coordinate and it will trigger the action that you associated with it.


For instance, LineitApp can set you up to get the device to automatically send a text message to your friend Joe, letting him know that you are on your way. You can instruct the device to send that text when you have gotten a block away from your house by drawing a line on the map exactly on the intersection following the one from your house. Once you cross that, the device sends the text you specified. If you thought that was cool, then the overly controlling parents in the crowd will start drooling over the “Send a line to anyone” feature. This basically will set the same functionality as you have on your device but on anyone else’s device. Once the person crosses the designated line, the action will trigger. For instance, you can instruct the other device to let you know when a person is getting home by setting a line on the path you know he/she takes to come home. Nifty feature.


The app is still in development but the dev seems to be adding more features as we speak (with the latest being an automated garage opener). Please drop by the thread and provide your feedback regarding the app as it will be really interesting to see what the limits for LineitApp are, or even if it has limits at all (as far as potential is concerned). You can find more information in the original LineitApp thread.


The post Draw a Line and Let Your Device Do the Rest with LineitApp appeared first on xda-developers.


July 24, 2014
Android Wear App Review: EchoWear Song Search – XDA Developer TV
www.xda-developers.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/echosearch-150x150.jpg" height="150" width="150" style="float: left; margin: 0 15px 15px 0;" />

Yesterday on XDA Developer TV, Producer AdamOutler tore down a Samsung Gear Live. If that intrigued you to enter into the realm of Android Wear, you may need some suggestions on what apps to get. Or maybe, you want to see what apps are available before you make the leap into wearables. Well, we are here to help!


XDA Recognized Developer kevdliu offers up an application for Wear that allows you identify a song completely from your Android Wear device. In this video, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews EchoWear Sony Search.  TK shows off the application, its uses, and functionality. He then shares his thoughts, so check out this app review.




Be sure to check out other great XDA Developer TV Videos



The post Android Wear App Review: EchoWear Song Search – XDA Developer TV appeared first on xda-developers.